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Alcoholics Anonymous

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Alcoholics Anonymous is a fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength, and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others to recover from alcoholism

The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop drinking. There are no dues or fees for AA membership; we are self-supporting through our own contributions

AA is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution; does not wish to engage in controversy; neither endorses nor opposes any causes

Our primary purpose is to stay sober and help other alcoholics to achieve sobriety
“Therefore nothing can matter more to the future welfare of AA than the manner in which we use this colossus of communication. Used unselfishly and well, the results can surpass our present imagination” (Bill W. Grapevine 1960 – more)
Co-Founder, Dr Bob
“If you still think you are strong enough to beat the game alone, that is your affair. But if you really and truly want to quit drinking liquor for good and all, and sincerely feel that you must have some help, we know that we have an answer for you…”

Co-founder of AA, Bill Wilson
“[N]o one could guess that I was to have no real employment for five years, or hardly draw a sober breath. My wife began to work in a department store, coming home exhausted to find me drunk…”

12 Steps and 12 Traditions of AA

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The 12 Suggested Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous

1. We admitted we were powerless over alcohol–that our lives had become unmanageable.

2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

5. Admitted to God, to ourselves and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God, as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

The 12 Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous

1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon A.A. unity.

2. For our group purpose, there is but one ultimate authority–a loving God as he may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.

3. The only requirement for A.A. membership is a desire to stop drinking.

4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups of A.A. as a whole.

5. Each group has but one primary purpose–to carry its message to the alcoholic who still suffers.

6. An A.A. group ought never endorse, finance or lend the A.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.

7. Every A.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.

8. Alcoholics Anonymous should remain forever nonprofessional, but our service centers may employ special workers.

9. A.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.

10. Alcoholics Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the A.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.

11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio and films.

12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before
personalities.

 

AA Dumbarton News and Announcements

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The Friday afternoon meeting that was in Red Cross rooms, Park street Alexandria
has moved to the old surgery in John street Renton same time 12:30pm

Video Step Meeting

There is an interest in the area for a video step meeting.
The AA rooms are free on Saturday nights and if you are interessted in helping start up this group then please contact me by email on [email protected]

Jim C
(webmaster)

The history of Alcoholics Anonymous started in Alexandria in 1963

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There is no other entertainment you will get better than what you get at casino online and you will get a big relief from the AA’s dull mood.

Alexandria Tues Night Group
Founder members Dot S Wee Betty Big Duncan Jimmy J

First Venue
Ben Tearooms in Balloch and after a few months we called ourselves Loch Lomond Group thinking we would attract visitors to our area but that never happened . So when we moved to the Conservative Rooms in Bank St Alexandria we converted to Alexandria Group For the first time we started records of meetings in Nov 65 and we had our first meeting in the Church Hall Church St Alexandria on 1st Decembr 1965 where we averaged 4 to 8 members and at times only 2 .

We stayed there for about 15 months and had our first meeting in the clinic Bank St on the 15th March 67 We knew our members would eventually grow and so it proed and the clinic became too small so another move had to be made this time to Christie Park School in January 1971 where we stayed until 1stFebruary 1977when we were fortunate to find our present rooms in the Christie Park Veterans Hut It was not easy to find rooms in the early days as AA was not well known so much time and effort was put in to each of these changes and we must be gateful to the people who did acomodate us

Also to the members from far and wide for supporting us with a visit and much advice they are too numerous to mentionand each of us will have our own fond memories

Scottish

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“A hundred Thousand Welcomes”
to
perth
and the
47th ANNUAL
SCOTTISH CONVENTION.
Friday 2nd – Sunday 4th May 2003

Venue this year
“The Quality Hotel”
at the station, Leonard Street
Perth PH2 8HE

Theme
“A New Beginning”

Renton Wednesday

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Start Date: 7th Nov 1973

Initial opening meeting 93 people

In Attendance

AA Members
Al Anon Members
Local Clergy
Members of the public
Welfare Dept

Collection £12 52
Less £ 5 00

Chairman Jimmy K
Speaker Meat Market Bobby
Renton Big Jim

Pete S. from Alexandria with Bill W. Co-founder of AA.

General Service Office New York 1962

Archives Committee are looking for anyone interested in writing a small article about the history of their home group.
Once we recieve information from you we will put it together with a few pictures of the venue onto the website,

Bonhill Thursday Afternoon Group

When the Dumbarton Thursday group closed after a while I decided to open this group on the same day as there was no meeting in the area on that afternoon.
The community centre along the road from me were kind enough to allow me the use of the hall between the hours of 13:30 & 15:30. Word of the meeting got around and a few people came on board and become group members. Before we opened the doors these members were wee stewart(me) Irish Brian and Jimmy mc.

The group started in the first week of december 2005.
David W joined the group a few months later and we then got out first female group member Gayle, who joined when the group was opened for 2 years.
The group is still in the dalmonach community centre, Bonhill and going strong with an average attendance of around 10 + visiting every week.

Wee Stewart

Forthcoming Events

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AA Dumbarton Forthcoming Events

gg

Dumbarton & District Area Intergroup

The 11th Lomond Gathering of Alcoholics Anonymous
Friday 26, Saturday 27 & Sunday 28 June 2009
VICTORIA HALLS, HELENSBURGH

Alexandria Friday Night Group

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Online slots in www.slotsguide.ca are quite exciting. Don’t miss the opportunity. It is a good diversion from the difficult Alcoholics Anonymous group discussions.

The Alexandria Friday Night Group, which is held in the “Drop-in” centre at 85 Bank Street, started in 1969 (I`m not sure of the exact date, it was either June or july) This was the second “Young peoples” group in Scotland, the first one being in Edinburgh.The group came into being just after I came into the fellowship. I was back living with my mother, who owned a building which contained four houses, three of which were Lying empty.

Young john, as he was then known, was looking for premises to start a young peoples group. My mother said that he could have one of the empty houses and that was all he needed. Before I knew what was happening they had gathered all the furnature and everything else they needed to start up the group. I`m not too sure who were the group members at that time but I know that Patricia, Crew-cut Campbell and young John L. were the first in the early days.

Jimmy K. Jimmy N. Concrete Bob Billy O. Snowy and his son, Jackie from Helensburgh, Nod, Stan, Walter, Mary, Plumber john, Jackie R. and Barney. I know I`ve missed out a lot of people but that was over 38 years ago and my memory is not so good now.
One thing I DO remember is that I thought they would have taken the house next door to ours, which was around the back and up the stairs. But they didn`t, they took the one on the main road.

I was new to AA then and nearly had a fit when they painted the front door bright Green and painted the number in bold white numerals 194. The address of the young peoples group was :- 194 Bank Street Alexandria.

From the very 1st meeting the wee group was a success, if my memory serves me right the top table on the first night was Murdo and Owen. Oh! the F riday nights we would have both during and after the meeting. After the meeting was finished they would come upstairs to my house and we would talk AA all night into the wee small hours of the next day.

How did AA come to Dumbarton?

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hhGood question, well it started with two people meeting, does that sound familiar! The two people in question were Eddie F and the other was the County Psychiatrist, Dr. Gilmour.

Eddie was in hospital when he first encountered AA and he had the idea that he would stand a better chance of staying sober if AA meetings were in the area where he lived.
He knew from his own experience that AA works and that others in the Dumbarton area could benefit too, Dr. Gilmour heard about this and approached Eddie, he said that if Eddie could arrange for other AA members to come to meetings in the Dumbarton area, then he would arrange a venue for them.

They both kept to their word and AA was introduced to Dumbarton.

This happened in June, 1960 and the first meeting took place in the Community Centre in Church Street. Further meetings were held in the Burgh Hall and the C.E. Centre. AA finally established a permanent venue in the C.E. Centre.

Some two years later a second venue was established in the Lomond Tea Rooms in Balloch. The meetings moved on a few occasion until the day came when they moved to the Bank Street Clinic, Alexandria where AA became firmly established.

By 1965 some 15-20 people were very much attracted to what AA had to offer and as time progressed meetings were opened in Helensburgh, Old Kilpatrick, Alexandria, Renton and other venues in Dumbarton. By 1970 AA had it’s own West of Scotland Inter Group which covered the areas of Kilmarnock to Ayr, Greenock, Bearsden, Clydebank, Dumbarton, Alexandria, Helensburgh and Renton.

There were in 1970 – 32 Groups in the West of Scotland and we got together in Gourock and Inter Group was started at that point.

As it stands today [2002] Dumbarton has it’s own Inter Group. We now have 31 well-established groups.

At a guess there is something like 800 people, very much involved in all these groups.

AA has never looked back since those early days in 1960 and AA has much to be thankful for, especially to those two gentlemen – Eddie F and Dr Gilmour.

No names have been involved in the writing of this brief history, with the exception of Eddie F and Dr. Gilmour. The early members have been of wonderful assistance, in gathering this information and we thank them all.

AA: How it Works

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Rarely have we seen a person fail who has thoroughly followed our path. Those who do not recover are people who cannot or will not completely give themselves to this simple program, usually men and women who are constitutionally incapable of being honest with themselves. There are such unfortunates. They are not at fault; they seem to have been born that way. They are naturally incapable of grasping and developing a manner of living which demands rigorous honesty. Their chances are less than average. There are those, too, who suffer from grave emotional and mental disorders, but many of them do recover if they have the capacity to be honest.

Our stories disclose in a general way what we used to be like, what happened, and what we are like now. If you have decided you want what we have and are willing to go to any length to get it – then you are ready to take certain steps.

At some of these we balked. We thought we could find an easier, softer way. But we could not. With all the earnestness at our command, we beg of you to be fearless and thorough from the very start. Some of us have tried to hold on to our old ideas and the result was nil until we let go absolutely.

Remember that we deal with alcohol – cunning, baffling, powerful! Without help it is to much for us. But there is One who has all power – that One is God. May you find Him now!

Half measures availed us nothing. We stood at the turning point. We asked His protection and care with complete abandon.
Here are the 12 steps we took,
which are suggested as a program of recovery:

We admitted we were powerless over alcohol – that our lives had become unmanageable.

Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.

Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.

Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.

Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.

Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.

Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.

Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.

Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.

Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.

Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.

Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to alcoholics, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.

Many of us exclaimed, “What an order! I can’t go through with it.” Do not be discouraged. No one among us has been able to maintain anything like perfect adherence to these principles. We are not saints. The point is, that we are willing to grow along spiritual lines. The principles we have set down are guides to progress. We claim spiritual progress rather than spiritual perfection.

Our description of the alcoholic, the chapter to the agnostic, and our personal adventures before and after make clear three pertinent ideas :

That we were alcoholic and could not manage our own lives.
That probably no human power could have relieved our alcoholism.
That God could and would if He were sought.